Language

St Alban's Catholic High School

Technology

Department Aims

The Design and Technology Department is made up of 5 areas:

  • Food Technology,
  • Graphics
  • Electronic/Product Design
  • Resistant Materials
  • Textiles

All areas are taught to all students at Key Stage 3 on a carousel, and students opt to specialise in one area at Key Stage 4.

Design and technology prepares students to participate in tomorrow’s rapidly-changing technologies. They learn to think and intervene creatively to improve the quality of life. The subject calls for students to become autonomous and creative problem-solvers, as individuals and as members of a team. They must look for needs, wants and opportunities and respond to them by developing a range of ideas and making products and systems. They combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics, social and environmental issues, function and industrial practices. As they do so, they reflect on and evaluate present and past design and technology, its uses and effects. Through design and technology, all students can become discriminating and informed users of products, and become innovators.

Year

Curriculum Content: Example activites

7

Graphic Design

Key Learning : Isometric Projection & The principles of Graphic Design. Through a series of drawing activities students learn to think and draw in 3-D using isometric projection. Students explore the basic principles of graphic design through a series of activities. By the end of the rotation students are able to objectively analyse a graphic identifying the use of “white space”, “balance”, “contrast”, and “consistency”.

 

Textiles

This is one of the three Textile Technology units that focus on designing: this one in year 7 is on fibres and the construction of fabric.  These units of work give the students a broad range of knowledge focussed on Textiles and allows the students to consider their clients and the final use of their product.

 

The design process: The design process is limited as there is more of a focus on skill and basic understanding. There are two small DMA activities. One where students make their own feltie key ring using the basic hand stitching skills. And the second is developing their machine skills and producing a fabric container.

 

To help the students develop their skills and understanding students will experience a variety of experimental and investigative lessons. These will cover what are textiles, where do they come from, how does this affect our environment. students will then develop their sewing skills by hand stitching and machine stitching. students will gain the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to carry out the make task successfully through product evaluation activities and focussed practical tasks.  They:

 

Use simple prototypes and modelling

Use a range of construction techniques

Consider safety and hygiene when handling equipment in the textile classroom.

 

There will also be opportunities for students to:

Understand how the environment needs to be considered when choosing/using textiles

Learn about the uses of specialist tools and equipment

Learn about specialist materials and components

 

Electronics

Health and Safety in the workshop

Looking at Tools and Equipment

Research Soldering/Electrical components/PCB’s/Microchips

Practice soldering

Manufacturing to include soldering components onto PCB and use of Solder Sucker to successfully take components out

Use of strip heater to bend acrylic around a mould into the amplifier stand

Use of 2D Design to design graphics for stand

Test Amplifier with cell phone

Evaluate against Specification

 

Resistant Materials

Health and Safety in the workshop

Looking at Tools and Equipment

Research Softwood/Hardwood/Manmade Boards

Disassembly of existing products

Measuring and Marking out accurately

Design ideas

Final idea designed on 2D Design for CAD/CAM Router manufacturing

Use of tenon saw, mitre jig, tri square, files for frame

Vacuum former for moulding HIP onto plywood with game design

Test Evaluate against Specification

8

Product Design

Key Learning areas:understanding that design is led by need as much as undirected creativity, the example in this case will be an app appropriate to an explored target audience, emphasising the real world nature of design.

 

Learning technical vocabulary related to the topic; interface, pixels, digital imaging, target audience/market/profile, scanning.

Reinforcing existing digital imaging skills acquired in ICT projects but utilised specifically for the apps (specifically App inventor 2).

Extending the knowledge regarding specifications of file size, image resolution and file types.

Students learn to plan their app from initial concept to final execution considering the basic design processes learned in App inventor. This allows students to create a wide range of outcomes dependent on their interest and ability. There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and choice of outcome.This unit is designed to introduce ICT as a design medium for product design, the rationale being the apps are digital products with a range of design aspects that need to fit user requirements. A range of skills is introduced to the students allowing some choice in the way of approaching their design solution. In year 7 the emphasis in graphics was drawing, the students in year 8 then have the opportunity to progress this in product design apps, where drawing skills and some digital manipulation is required to conform to the screen specifications. This has links with ICT where similar programmes are used to create animations, this reinforces learning in both subjects and demonstrates clear relationships between disciplines

 

Graphic Design

Key learning : Perspective drawing & Symbols and SymbolismThrough a series of drawing activities students expand on their knowledge of 3-D design by practising single-point, two-point and three-point perspective drawing.Students explore the notion of “wordless messages” though a series of explorative tasks and design activities. They will consider mandatory product labelling, road signage, safety labelling.The design and make activity is a printmaking task with cross-curricular links to illustrate their set English reading book. Within this work students will consider the value of symbolism in written texts, touching on cultural differences with a view to producing a final printed illustration. Understanding volume production and an introduction to commercial printing processes is covered.Through a series of drawing activities students expand on their knowledge of 3-D design by practising single-point, two-point and three-point perspective drawing.Students explore the notion of “wordless messages” though a series of explorative tasks and design activities. They will consider mandatory product labelling, road signage, safety labelling.

 

Textiles

In year 8 the focus is on decorating fabrics.  These units of work give the students a broad range of knowledge focussed on Textiles and allows the students to consider their clients and the final use of their product.

 

The design process:

students will be guided through the design process in order to produce a quality product meeting the needs of the design brief

To help the students develop their design ideas they will sample a wide range of surface techniques which will allow them the ability to make an informed decision about their final product.

students will gain the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through product evaluation activities and focussed practical tasks.  They:

Use simple prototypes and modelling

Use a range surface decoration techniques- safety and hygiene when handling equipment in the textile classroom.

 

There will also be opportunities for students to:

Understand different cultures with a cross curricular link with RE-Learn about the uses of specialist tools and equipment

Learn about specialist materials and components.

 

Resistant Materials

Look at Mechanical Advantage

Classification of Levers 1, 2 and 34 different motions and 2 other

Camshafts, chain and sprockets, crank and sliders, pulley systems, rack and pinion, sliding bevel, parallel linkages (any number of mechanisms can be looked at)Look at different  shaped cams and the different motions produced Transfer of motion Followers, off-set cams, identification of tight fit and loose fit appropriate to drillingDesign ideas drawn Scale 1:1 Orthographic Drawing

Manufacturing to include measuring and marking out accurately, use of mitre jig on sander tenon saw, drill gauge, pillar drill and hand vices, accurate assembly throughout, cutting cam profiles with the use of coping saw or jig saw Test Evaluate against Specification

9

Resistant Materials

Research existing weather vanes, in particular look at Ferrous, Non-Ferrous and Alloys and look at manufacturing techniques including brazing and casting Draw out Weather vane Make 3D model out of card and wood Find balance point and test Design own weather vane with a working drawing Manufacture by hand or transfer selected parts to 2D design to be cut out with Cam Milling machine Manufacture with mild steel rod and sheet using hacksaw, guillotine, files, wet and dry paper, scribes to mark out punches to find balance point Use of metal lathe for drilling internal hole for pop-rivet attachment Use of Forge to braze weather vane arrowhead and own design on either end of 6mm steel rod Use of pillar drill to drill cross beam Use of coping saw and jigsaw for manufacture of base Accuracy with assembly throughout Photo Test Evaluate against Specification 

10

Design and Technology at GCSE is offered in the following subjects; Graphic Products, Resistant Materials, Product Design, Textiles, Food Technology. 

 

The examination board is AQA and students will gain experience of materials/ingredients, tools and processes within their chosen specialism through a series of practical tasks. This knowledge is reinforced with theory lessons.

 

Graphic Products

Year 10 Students will undertake a number of projects and assignments to learn new skills, experience new materials and improve on their knowledge and understanding gained at KS3.

  • Drawing skills : the first ½ term is dedicated to enhancing students 3D drawing ability plus the introduction to new materials and equipment.

  • PrintIT : a national competition sponsored by the print industry and the FairTrade Foundation. This is an excellent introduction to the rigours of a longer term design project. It focuses on commercial printing processes and real-life design briefs. There are fantastic prizes up for grabs, including trips abroad.

  • Design Ventura : a national competition run by the Design Museum, London and judged by leading UK designers. Each year the Design Museum issues a brief to design an object for sale in the Design Museum shop. The overall winning team/school will see their product in production and on sale.

These projects offer students realistic experience of answering a design brief, creating a portfolio of work and presenting their work in a challenging environment.

 

Textiles

Focus on the skills of construction and surface decoration. students sample a wide variety of techniques and also complete small practical activities. Small coursework projects are set to give the students an understanding of the main coursework task in Yr11. We also use past exam papers to develop the students understanding and knowledge and prepare them for the written paper.They will:Develop their knowledge of the sewing machine Develop skills in construction Develop skills in surface decoration Consider safety and hygiene when handling equipment in the textile classroom.Use prototypes and models in the manufacturing process Learn about the uses of specialist tools and equipment.Learn about specialist materials and components.Use and understand smart materials Use and understand mass production techniques

 

Resistant Materials

Manufacturing a wooden puzzle consisting of seven different pieces

Making each part individually using different methods of joining

Butt Joint

Dowel joint

Bridle joint with dowel

Halving joint

Countersunk screw joint

Stub dowel joint

Through housing joint

Then manufacturing a box with a push fit lid to house the puzzle using rebate joints

Manufacturing a metal candlestick holder consisting of three parts

Making each part individually using different methods of cutting, shaping and brazing for joining

6mm steel rod for the base

1mm steel sheet for holder

25mm steel tube for candle holder

Cutting a 6M thread on a steel rod to attach to acrylic or metal (depending on what is in stock to cut the internal thread)Cutting, shaping and joining acrylic

Individual mini project to involve:Use of jig saws, vacuum former, strip heater

Use of lathes for wood turning and turning acrylic and metal on engineering lathe

Use of laser cutter, router and miller via 2D Design if appropriate to material and product to be manufacturing

 

Food

Studying Food Technology can lead to exciting and well paid career opportunities within the food industry. This industry sector is one of the largest employers within the UK. Having a Food Technology qualification can lead to careers in food marketing, product development, diet-related industries, hospitality management, food journalism and more. Through a series of design and cook activities students will experience a range of ingredients, processes, cuisines, tastes, cultures, and practical food production. Learning about foods, ingredients, processes and techniques. Experimenting, investigating and testing products. Being creative and designing new products Understanding how a product is developed and made industry Developing practical cooking skills Understanding about diet and health Making consumer choices

11

GCSE Design and Technology - All Subject specialisms

 

Towards the end of year 10 students will begin their final GCSE project which will be due for completion by February half term leaving sufficient time for examination practise and theory prior to public examinations. 

12&13

ART AND DESIGN: Graphic Communication

 

Graphics is based on ideas and designs that provoke thought and interest; there is a natural bias towards commercial intent. The course is art-based and it is essential that students have competent drawing skills. The course will cover a variety of different specialisms including printing, advertising, digital imaging, packaging, illustration and video graphics. Our students complete the course with such strong work that last year all were accepted "unconditionally" on the UCS foundation course.

 

Course Outline Examining Body - AQA.AS Level AS – Coursework. Unit 1 – Portfolio unit. This is an extended coursework unit that allows students to develop a range of practical approaches based on a starting theme. Students will be expected to work in several disciplines producing a minor and major piece of work.AS – Externally Set Assignment. Unit 2 There is an extended preparation period from February to develop investigations and responses towards a final piece. There are 5 themes to choose from. The final exam will consist of a supervised period of 5 working hours resulting in a developmental or final study.A2 Level A2 – Coursework. Unit 3 – Personal investigation. Students will select an area of Design to study using gallery visits and research work as an initial springboard for selection of a personal theme. The unit will be based around “problem solving”. Practical work must be supported by an essay of between 1,000 and 3,000 words.A2 – Externally Set Assignment. Unit 4 There is an extended preparation period to develop investigations and responses towards a final piece. There are 8 themes to choose from. The final exam is 15 hours.Course Assessment AS Unit 1- Portfolio unit 50% of overall grade.  Unit 2- ESA 50% of overall gradeA2 Unit 3- Personal Investigation 50% of overall grade Unit 4- ESA 50% of overall gradeProgression This course is suitable for students who wish to undertake further studies in Art, Craft and Design, usually at Art college or further education, as well as those who are looking to take up careers for which an art/design background is relevant. These might include advertising, publishing, architecture, fashion, interior design, textiles, fine art, illustration, teaching, and theatre or costume designEntry requirements The best foundation for success at AS Level and A Level is a good grade at GCSE - at least Grade C. If students  have not taken GCSE Art or Graphic Communication, they will need to provide evidence of a portfolio of work that shows both their skills and commitment to Art and Design before they will be offered a place on the course.Additional Information This course is taught as a partnership course between other schools and St Alban’s: 2 x two and a half hour lessons a week. Students will be expected to equip themselves with sketchbooks throughout the course and have a selection of art equipment at home. They will also need an A1 folder / portfolio in which to store work. Further information from Mr. M. Pattinson HOD Design&Technology.Product DesignIntroductionThis stimulating product design course offers enthusiastic and creative designers the opportunity to be inspired, develop key skills and become innovative in a rapidly changing world.  If students have a passion for designing products, as well as improving or developing ideas whilst readily accepting ‘hands-on’ challenges, this is the course for them. Product design is an all encompassing design subject which allows students to broaden their material knowledge. However, the bias is aimed firmly at materials such as card, wood, metal and plastic. Ultimately the course provides flexibility for students to specialise in their desired material area using up-to-date equipment and facilities including lasercutting and 3-D Printing.Course Outline Examining body - OCRAs with GCSE work, the A Level has a strong coursework weighting. Students must be organised in their work and deliver results in the subject, both in lessons and through home study and allocated study periods. This will be supported by outstanding and passionate teachers, allowing students’ potential to flourish.Course AssessmentAS Level 60% Coursework – Product Study.Select an existing, marketed product – analyse it and develop ideas to improve it. Work consists of analysis, evaluation, ideas generation, product development, CAD modelling and testing. This coursework does not feature a final constructed product but instead allows creativity and imagination to thrive.40% Exam – Advanced Innovation Challenge.Students complete work similar in format to that of typical DT coursework but in an exam setting. Students will design a product for a given situation, developing, modelling and presenting ideas. This involves both written and small scale practical work. The bulk of the exam is performed over the period of a full school day.A2 Level60% Coursework – Design, Make and Evaluate.Based on student’s most confident material area, this coursework is very typical of DT coursework completed at GCSE. Students design from concept through to a final constructed product, a project of their choice. This is an incredibly detailed piece of work that allows students to be creative whilst producing a final product of market potential and professional standard.40% Exam – Product Design.Based on student’s chosen material strengths, there are 2 sections to the exam. One section focuses on knowledge of material technology, whilst the other section involves creating ideas for a given design situation.Progression Great pride is taken in the success of students, many of whom use their design skills in higher education and/or work settings. Students who have progressed to university have studied – Architecture, Product Design, Graphic Design, Furniture Design and Engineering, amongst others. Some students have gained immediate employment or an apprenticeship in the fields of Civil Engineering, Construction and Carpentry.Entry requirements Students must have a grade C in any Design and Technology subject.Additional Information Further information from Mr Pattinson HOD, Design&Technology.TextilesYr12 – students learn a range of techniques in the first half term mainly focussed on decorative textilesYr13 – students focus on one or two techniques and build up their skill and knowledge throughout year 13Summary of programme/units of workstudents will be guided through the design and make process in order to produce a quality product meeting the needs of the design brief.To help the students develop their design ideas they will investigate a range of textile artists and make prototypes and models, which they will test, evaluate and modify before starting to make their final product.The class will also be taught by various professionals that come into school free of charge. These include the SewJustUs duo who have been working with St Albans now for 3 years. Their valuable skills and knowledge is passed down in work shops where the students are busy producing creative pieces and students are also encouraged to ask questions about the exquisite pieces of textiles that are brought in as display.

  • Printing on papers and fabrics

  • Embellishment via machine embroidery, hand embroider, beads, sequins

  • Constructed using bonded fabrics

  • Heat manipulation

  • Pattern development